Porto Seguro (Brazil)  Medium-Dark Roast
Porto Seguro (Brazil)  Medium-Dark Roast
Porto Seguro (Brazil)  Medium-Dark Roast
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Porto Seguro (Brazil) Medium-Dark Roast

Vendor
Boarding Pass Coffee
Regular price
$16.50
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$16.50
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Our signature roast, Porto Seguro, is a smooth specialty coffee from Brazil. This is a solid, classic coffee with superior quality that makes for an enjoyable everyday brew. 

These Arabica coffee beans are hand-selected and from a region known for consistently well-structured and sweet beans. The medium-dark roast level accentuates the sweet and nutty flavors of the beans. Other flavor notes include chocolate, apple, almond, molasses, and dried fruits.

Porto Seguro means 'Safe Harbor” in english and is named for the place where navigators from Portugal first landed on Brazilian soil in 1500.  A cup of Porto Seguro is a great way to start your day with smooth sailing and great discoveries ahead! See below to learn more about Porto Seguro in Brazil.

Flavor notes: Chocolate, apple, nuts

Process: Natural

ABOUT PORTO SEGURO, BRAZIL

On April 22, 1500, Portuguese navigators, led by Pedro Alvares Cabral, spotted land on the northeast coast of the land we now know as Brazil. Two days later, he and his crew anchored in Porto Seguro (or Safe Port, in English) set foot on firm land.

The northeast of Brazil is well-known today for its beautiful beaches and resort towns like Trancoso. But when Cabral landed, all he saw was unspoiled beaches and forest with abundant vegetation along the coast and rivers inland. There, he was met by the Tupinamba Indians. These groups initially had a mutually beneficial relationship harvesting pau-brasil trees. In fact, the name Brazil actually from the pau-brasil wood, which is the indigenous red hardwood that was valued for its durability and ability to make red dye, prized especially in Europe at the time. The area was colonized and many of the historical buildings and landmarks still stand today.